Home

Guruji

Style

Press

Pratibha

Nirmal

Rekha

Rama

Schools

Gallery

Gallery2

Gallery3

Students


 

 

About Guru Surendra Nath Jena’s Style of Odissi:

 

The most unique element of Guruji’s dance style is the way it is entrenched in Bhakti Ras. Bhaav (emotion) is given prime importance in all his dances. Hence, his dance is meant for atma-ranjan (pleasing the soul) rather than lok-ranjan (pleasing the world). The movements and especially, the abhinaya, emphasizes more on the lokdharmi sentiments, shown as sahaj, or natural, as in life. His ashtapadis of Geeta Govinda, are hence, based on bhaav-sanchari (communication through emotions), rather than shabd-sanchari (literal communication). A  documentary was producedin 2006 (See: http://humanitieslab.stanford.edu/51/67). Another significant element is that his dances are danced in a smaller space, retaining the idea of space in the Nat Mandap of the Konark Temple. Konark Kanti, Guruji’s first dance piece, was created in 1968, after he visited the temple for the first time. The basic twelve poses or units of his dance are based on the sculptures of that temple. He has explored the ‘sculpturesque pose’ further, by shaping it as a unit of movement, thus rendering the sculptural narrative, kinetically alive.

 

Dance scholars who have researched his style have stated that his style is based on many karanas of the Natyashastra; in fact, many new karanas have been explored through this dance style. The explorations encompass various possibilities of movement and shifts of weight at different levels, even while seated on the floor, as sculpted at Konark. His prolific creation of over 35 dances have reflected both - the postures of temple sculpture, and the symbolic relation of man and nature, the spontaneity of everyday life.

 

Guruji was of the opinion that every emotion or rasa, has its appropriate place in life. Therefore, his dances reverberate with both tandava and lasya elements, in contrast to other Odissi styles, which are based more so on lasya. Imbued with Shaiva, Vaishnava and Shakta or Tantric content within the context of Bhakti, his abhinaya also gives importance to Vibhatsa, Bhayanak (horrific) and Raudra (anger) rasas, relating them to his early experience of rural culture in Orissa, where the terrific aspect of the goddess is worshipped. This emotion and ideology is explored in his dance composition Shakti Rupa Yogini. While other Odissi styles emphasise mostly the Shringari ras, Guru Surendra Nath Jena’s style emphasizes all the rasas (sentiments) equally, considering them all integral parts to the holistic nature of abhinaya. His dance pieces are also characterized by rapid changes in both taal and style, echoing the many ups and downs of life. 

Guruji gave as much importance to bhaav (the emotions) as he does to the bhangima (the basic poses), and was of the opinion that one is incomplete without the other. He upheld the ancient belief that Bhakti finds expression in dance and music, which is a form of sadhana, of pure devotion to God.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home

 Guru Jena

 Style

 Pratibha

 Nirmal

 Rekha

 Rama

 Schools

 Gallery

Press